How I got a huge pile of old student loans off my Experian Report

Want to repair your credit but keep hitting a brick wall?

Did you know that according to the Federal Fair Credit Reporting Act or FCRA,  15 U.S.C. § 1681, when you dispute something on your credit reports such as Experian, Equifax and Transunion, the Credit Reporting Agency you’ve written to must investigate your dispute. That makes sense and is perfectly easy to understand. No problem so far.

However, the code section actually requires that the credit reporting agency, (usually Experian, Equifax and Trans Union) “shall, free of charge, conduct a reasonable reinvestigation” which of course means that you’re in luck, which means that there is even less than no problem so far.

So what if you dispute something and the credit reporting agency investigates the information, and the party who furnished the information to Experian, Equifax or Trans Union reports back to the credit reporting agency that the information is correct? If you believe that it is not correct, then you may send in another dispute of the same information outlining why you believe it is incorrect, and the credit reporting agency must “reinvestigate.”

So, I was trying to buy a house, ages ago, but I had loads of student loans on my credit files listed, in some cases, as many months late because it was shortly after graduating and passing the bar and for a long time I didn’t yet have a job or career to speak of, and so I got into some financial trouble. We did eventually flip a couple of houses and pay off all of my student loans, so I wasn’t a complete loser, but my credit was still shot from it all. And this last house, I didn’t want to flip, I just wanted a good interest rate and couldn’t get it. In retrospect I should have taken the bad interest rate, closed quickly and flipped it anyway.

So, I checked my credit reports and realized that almost all of my old student loans had been listed inaccurately. They were listed as most of them over 120 days late. Hahaha! But I knew better, most of them were over 180 days late. So I sent in a dispute. And month after month, Sallie Mae kept reporting that they were right and I was wrong.

However, at long last, after about six (6) disputes and ten (10) months later, suddenly all of them disappeared all at once from my Experian credit file. I can only guess what happened, either they finally agreed with me, or maybe the person who worked for Sallie Mae verifying information for credit reporting agencies must have been on vacation or maternity leave or died or something.

Credit Repair works, and you don’t have to be an attorney nor hire one in order to get fantastic results! For the proper form of such dispute letters and so so much more, go to the Attorney’s Guide to Credit Repair for fast easy guaranteed results.

Yes, I do get paid a small commission when you buy the Attorney’s Guide, but you should buy it anyway. 

Credit Repair Takes Effort

No one is going to fix or repair your credit for you, not without some significant money exchanging hands first. But you can fix your own credit. You can repair your credit with the appropriate guidance from someone who knows what they’re doing.

Unfortunately with my busy law practice I don’t have that kind of time to help you with you efforts to rehabilitate your credit. I can steer your in the right direction though. With the Attorney’s Guide to Credit Repair, you will know the next step to take.

It’s fast, affordable, and real. Credit Repair you can afford because you are making the effort yourself. The step by step guide will bring you confidence in the market place and can give you the credit scores you need to buy a home, a car with a low interest rate, or perhaps open a business loan, provided however only if you make the efforts.

Credit repair to most people is a mystery. Why is the sky blue? I don’t know, because it is. Why is my credit score below 600? Usually you have some ideas if that’s the case. However, when you ask but how do I bring it up to 700 or more? Lots of people will tell you that they’ll do it for you for only, a lot more money than you have in the bank. Many will tell you that you just have to write the appropriate letters to get credit reporting agencies such as Experian, Trans Union and Equifax to correct the information in your credit files. But how do you do that?

I’ve reviewed the Fair Credit Reporting Act’s code sections and the laws regarding Fair Credit Reporting are on your side. In my bankruptcy law practice I would charge quite a lot of money just for a consultation on the subject, but when I found the Attorney’s Guide to Credit Repair, I was floored. They’re practically giving you all of our secrets for pennies on the dollar.

Yes, I do get a commission when you buy the Attorney’s Guide to Credit Repair, and yes, you should buy it.